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Falcons Uniform History: The strength of #36

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Two excellent contributors and a few useful players are on the list for #36.

Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

There's actually enough impressive candidates here that I felt the need to break out four deserving players, even if one of them is more of a speculative deserving player than anything else.

As you might expect, #36 is the home of defensive backs, and there were a couple of terrific ones who wore the number in Atlanta. Let's take a closer look.

Ken Reaves

Reaves played cornerback for Atlanta for eight seasons, ringing up 30 interceptions, six forced fumbles and his fair share of highlight reel plays. He was just 22 years old when he joined the Falcons in 1966, their first year of existence, and was inarguably one of the best players on those early, largely miserable Atlanta teams.

Reaves went on to enjoy several more quality years, primarily as a safety, but he was at his best in Atlanta.

Bob Glazebrook

Glazebrook spent seven seasons with Atlanta in the late 70's and early 80's, primarily serving as the team's strong safety. He wasn't a great player, but he was a solid and productive one, putting up eight interceptions and six forced fumbles during his tenure. Glazebrook was done, sadly, after his age 27 season.

Lawyer Milloy

Milloy gave the Falcons a stable veteran presence at safety for three seasons, piling up three picks, 15 pass deflections, a forced fumble and over 200 tackles during that time.

His best years were over at this point, but Milloy offered physicality and coverage chops the team sorely needed from 2006-2008, when the team went through three coaches in a three year span.

Kemal Ishmael

Not even close just yet, but hopefully someday Ishmael will belong in this conversation.

Reaves is the choice here. He was one of the franchise's few early bright spots, one of the better cornerbacks in franchise history and a guy who doesn't get enough credit for what he accomplished during his tenure here. Congratulations, Mr. 36.